Heat Advisory

This week the Pendleton National Weather Service has released a severe hot weather warning it will be to be 100-105°

The City of Pendleton encourages you to check in on your neighbors, be mindful of the elderly and the little ones who may require a bit more attention and assistance.

This is a friendly reminder, how easy it is to get heat exhaustion or heat stroke in this type of extremely hot weather over several days. Please drink plenty of water and stay hydrated. 

What is heat stroke?

Heatstroke is the most serious heat-related illness. It occurs when the body becomes unable to control its temperature: the body’s temperature rises rapidly, the sweating mechanism fails, and the body is unable to cool down. Body temperature may rise to 106°F or higher within 10 to 15 minutes. Heatstroke can cause death or permanent disability if emergency treatment is not provided.

What is heat exhaustion?

Heat exhaustion is a milder form of heat-related illness that can develop after several days of exposure to high temperatures and inadequate or unbalanced replacement of fluids. Those most prone to heat exhaustion are outdoor maintenance & elderly people, those with high blood pressure, and those working or exercising in a hot environment.

What are the warning signs of a heat stroke?

Warning signs of heatstroke vary but may include the following:

  • Heavy sweating
  • Paleness
  • Muscle cramps
  • Tiredness
  • Weakness
  • Dizziness
  • Headache
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Fainting
  • Heat exhaustion
  • An extremely high body temperature (above 103°F)
  • Red, hot, and dry skin (no sweating)
  • Rapid, strong pulse
  • Throbbing headache
  • Confusion
  • Unconsciousness

What should I do if I see someone with any of the warning signs of heatstroke?

If you see any of these signs, you may be dealing with a life-threatening emergency. Have someone call for immediate medical assistance while you begin cooling the victim. Do the following:

  • Get the victim to a shady area.
  • Cool the victim rapidly, using whatever methods you can. For example, immerse the victim in a tub of cool water; place the person in a cool shower; spray the victim with cool water from a garden hose; sponge the person with cool water; or if the humidity is low, wrap the victim in a cool, wet sheet and fan him or her vigorously.
  • Monitor body temperature and continue cooling efforts until the body temperature drops to 101-102°F.
  • If emergency medical personnel are delayed, call the hospital emergency room for further instructions.
  • Do not give the victim alcohol to drink.
  • Get medical assistance as soon as possible.
Release Date